PROCESS

Twenty-Five Painters, October 2020


October 2 - All Day Pop-In


Artist(s):

Adam Vinson, Sandra Flood, Paul Cristina, Robert Lange, Michelle Doll, Reynier Llanes, Mia Bergeron, Kerry Simmons, Patrick Nevins, Mario Robinson, Adam Hall, June Stratton, Mary Engel, Patrick Kramer, Brett Scheifflee, Alia El-Bermani, Genevieve May, Victor Grasso, Alexandra Becker Black, Charles Williams, Patrick Nevins, Jeffrey Lange, Sara Scribner, Nadine Robbins, Larisa Brechun, Diane David Craig, Skip Rohde

About the Exhibit

Through the country’s experience of Covid-19 our artists have fought cancer, had babies, strengthened movements like Me Too and Black Lives Matter, fought for change through DACA, NARF, and LGBTQ legislation, bought new houses, created new studios, they’ve helped run campaigns, transformed into teachers…

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P R O C E S S

 

30 painters react to 2020 using the healing process of art

 

On view October 3 – 29

 

Opening Reception: All day Oct 3, 11-5pm

 

Robert Lange Studios’ upcoming exhibit, “Process,” features the work of 30 renown painters focusing on the emotional effects of 2020 through the healing process of painting. Robert Lange says of the exhibit, “Through the country’s experience of Covid-19 our artists have fought cancer, had babies, strengthened movements like Me Too and Black Lives Matter, fought for change through DACA, NARF, and LGBTQ legislation, bought new houses, created new studios, they’ve helped run campaigns, transformed into teachers and caregivers, and masked crusaders…..the list is endless. We wanted to give them the opportunity to paint about it, so we asked some of the most emotive painters we have ever worked with to create one piece that showcases these feelings on canvas.”

 

Process” will be a collection of works meant to open the hearts and minds of those who see the paintings. As well as, remind the artists and viewers that we are all in our own way struggling with the events of this year. Accompanying each work will be a written explanation in the artist’s words, describing the inspiration of their painting. 

 

Nadine Robbins created a powerful portrait of a single tattered black glove in the shape of a fist in a 24-inch by 24-inch painting titled, “His Life Mattered.” Nadine says of the work, “As a nurse’s wife during the COVID epidemic, I isolated myself much longer. Consequently, it made it harder for me to protest on the streets. So painting this glove live on Instagram became my way to participate in the Black Lives Matter movement. This painting of a black glove molded into a fist is a visual reminder for future generations of the murder of a man, a father, and how his death forced us to reexamine our racist history and our roles in it.”

 

In another work Patrick Kramer has depicted Rembrandt’s famous “Self Portrait with Two Circles” coming off the substrate with the canvas no longer attached. Of the painting created, titled “Your Services Are No Longer Required” 26-inches by 22 inches oil on panel, Kramer says, During difficult times, the occupation of artist seems silly, a self-indulgent luxury that is the first to go in a depressed economy. I’ve certainly felt frustration in realizing my skill set is of little benefit to society, my job truly “unessential”. And yet, for thousands of years, artists have persisted. From Palaeolithic cave paintings to the Sistine Chapel, artists continue to create. In good times and bad, as impractical as it may seem, the creative impulse survives. The arts endure because they are not only worthwhile, but important.” 

 

Gallery owner and artists, Robert Lange has created his most time consuming and largest portrait to date for the exhibit. Robert says of the painting, “In the wake of George Floyd’s death I had a desperate desire to listen. I decided to approach the BLM movement with the idea that I actually knew nothing about the challenges an entire race has been facing for far too long. I decided that I would make a painting about this earnest desire to listen. I went back through the thousands of portraits I have taken over the years and set out to make the most time consuming and intricate portrait of my life, focusing in on a stranger whose story I did not know. I found an image of a young woman from San Francisco I had taken 2 years ago at the Pride Parade. Her gaze was direct and vulnerable, powerful and confident. Her hair, her eyes, her shirt all demanded an excessive amount of time to render. I listened to her unknown pains and joys through her eyes, her story and character through her hair and her choice of clothing. With each brushstroke and passing hour I felt more connected to this “someone” I did not know.”

 

Reynier Llanes’ “Hidden Treasure” oil on canvas, speaks about nature, an appreciation for the treasures that often lie right before our eyes. Reynier says, “In these times of Covid-19 we have become closer and more observant of mother nature. We have become more appreciative of the importance of nature in our lives and how we are affected by it as much as we are affecting it. This piece focuses on a landscape, a human figure, and parallel worlds. It demonstrates a yearning and a desire for a deeper connection with nature, with ourselves, and with each other.”

 

Mia Bergeron has created an interior 34-inch by 24-inch painting with still life titled “Outlook.” The piece, filled with rich reds and orange tones, seems like a reality that has been disrupted. She says, “I want the viewer to feel that this space is both private and warped, creating a bit of a sea-sick feeling mixed with joyous colors and familiar objects.  Because so far, that’s what it’s felt like to be inside and isolated from everyone. There are days when my thoughts will warp the external world and will make it seem so confusing that I’m not sure what’s even real. And there are days I’ve delighted in all the privacy, all the time to work on the things I’ve put off for too long, all the social pressures lifted.  It’s a constant shift, sometimes minute to minute between these two polarized feelings. The visual paradox is both unsettling and calming to me, depending on where I am emotionally when I look at this painting.”

 

All are invited to visit and enjoy this powerful body of work through the month of October. The gallery is open from 11-5 everyday, all are welcome. 

 

Artists participating include: 

 

Adam Vinson, Sandra Flood, Paul Cristina, Robert Lange, Michelle Doll, Reynier Llanes, Mia Bergeron, Kerry Simmons, Patrick Nevins, Mario Robinson, Adam Hall, June Stratton, Mary Engel, Patrick Kramer, Brett Scheifflee, Alia El-Bermani, Genevieve May, Victor Grasso, Alexandra Becker Black, Charles Williams, Patrick Nevins, Jeffrey Lange, Sara Scribner, Nadine Robbins, Larisa Brechun, Diane David Craig, Skip Rohde

 

Exhibit Images


Opening Night

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ROBERT LANGE STUDIOS

TWO QUEEN ST, CHARLESTON

Robert Lange Studios